Russia Travel Advisory
August 15, 2022

Do Not Travel and Leave Immediately

U.S. Visas

English

U.S. Visa: Reciprocity and Civil Documents by Country

Cuba

Cuba
Republic of Cuba

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None One    2 Months 
A-2 None One  2 Months 
A-3 1 None One 2 Months
B-1 None One 6 Months
B-2 None One 3 Months
B-1/B-2 None One 3 Months
C-1 $26.00 One 3 Months
C-1/D $26.00 One 3 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
C-W-1 11 None One 3 Months
C-W-2 11 None One 3 Months
D None One 3 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None One 3 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 3 Months 
G-2 None One 3 Months
G-3 None One 3 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 3 Months
H-1B None One 3 Months 3
H-1C None One 3 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A3
H-2B None N/A N/A3
H-2R None One 3 Months 3
H-3 None One 3 Months 3
H-4 None One 3 Months 3
I None One 3 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None One 6 Months
K-4 None One 6 Months
L-1 None One 3 Months
L-2 None One 3 Months
M-1 None One 3 Months
M-2 None One 3 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None One 3 Months 3
O-2 None One 3 Months 3
O-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-1 None One 3 Months 3
P-2 None One 3 Months 3
P-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-4 None One 3 Months 3
Q-1 6 None One 3 Months 3
R-1 None One 3 Months
R-2 None One 3 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
T-D 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None One 3 Months
V-2 None One 3 Months 8
V-3 None One 3 Months 8

Country Specific Footnotes

▲. Visas in categories A-1 and A-2 may be revalidated in the Department for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States. G-1 visas may be revalidated at USUN for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States.

◉. Diplomatic couriers may be issued A-1 visas valid for multiple entries, 12 months, upon initial application abroad.

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes

  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi, Libyan, Somalian, Sudanese, Syrian or Yemeni nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

General Document Information:

Cuban civil documents are largely hand-written on non-controlled paper with few or no security features.  There is no standard practice to determine when civil documents can or should be computer-generated from electronic databases instead of being handwritten.  Computer-generated documents vary in font, printer type, and paper quality, leaving no way to determine their validity based upon those features.  The Cuban Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MINREX) can certify the validity of the signature on the document, but this does not mean that they are verifying the authenticity of the content.

At present, identity cards are equipped with enhanced security features such as holograms and micro text and they are linked to a national database including digitized photographs,fingerprints, and signatures.  For minors under 16 years a similar new plastic identity card is recently issued.  Photos are optional from the age of five and mandatory from 12 years old.  Minors’ identity cards contain the word Menor (minor) instead of holder 'signature.  Additionally, many children are issued paper booklets with handwritten information.  Parents can request the minor’s identity document at the hospital where the child is born and it includes address, gender, child and parents' names, expiration date and civil registry’s office.

Most of the following documents require a stamp from the National Tax Office. Foreigners and Cuban nationals living abroad, as well as Cuban residents, pay for these stamps in CUP (Cuban peso).

General Issuing Authority Information:

All the following documents are issued by public institutions. Types, costs, procedures, and terms, among other factors, are determined by Cuban laws and regulations.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available

Fees: Procedures and fees depend on whether the individual requesting the birth certificate lives in Cuba or abroad.

Cuban national living in Cuba: Birth certificates should be requested at any civil registry, generally at either the one where the registration was made, or the one in the municipality where the individual resides. In order to request the birth certificate of an individual, the interested party must provide a five Cuban pesos (CUP)stamp and information regarding the birth registration (name and surname, place of registration, place and date of birth, tome and folio of the registration). Delivery times may vary from one day to a week.

Cuban national living abroad: Birth certificates can be requested at any civil registry through a relative or contact living in Cuba. If the Cuban national living abroad is in Cuba, it can be requested through the International Legal Consultancy (Consultoría Jurídica Internacional [CJI]); there is a branch office in each province). The request fee is 1250 CUP. Legalization at the MINREX has a fee of 375 CUP and must have 125 CUP in stamps affixed to the document.  CJI usually delivers the birth certificate in 15 to 20 working days. If the interested party is not in Cuba, the certificate should be requested through a Cuban consulate abroad. The fees and delivery times depend on each consulate.

Document Name:  Certificación de nacimiento.

Issuing Authority:  Registro del Estado Civil (Civil Registry). Civil registries belong to the Ministry of Justice. There is one civil registry in each of the 168 municipalities in Cuba.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Registrador (Registrar).

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Birth certificates can be issued in a printed format on white letter size paper or in a pre-printed form, with handwritten information added.  They must have a five CUP stamp, the seal of the Civil Registry and the signature of the registrar that issues the document.

Registration Criteria:  Births must be registered at the corresponding Civil Registry, according to the place of birth.  When a child is born in a healthcare facility (at present almost all births take place at healthcare facility), the declaration regarding the birth of the child to the designated authority of the facility, must be made within 72 hours of the birth, and is usually made by the mother, father, or both.  If the declaration is made by another person, in case the parents cannot make it, it must be made within 30 days of the birth.  The declaration consists of the personal data of the parents, date and place of birth of the newborn child, corresponding registry information, gender of the child, name and surname, etc.

Procedure for Obtaining:  Birth certificates are available from civil registries for Cuban citizen residents.  They should request the document themselves or through a third party.  Formerly resident Cuban citizens, including all dual citizens, are considered as exclusively Cuban citizens by the Cuban Government.  They must request civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad if they are abroad, or at the International Legal Consultancy if they are in Cuba.  They may also request it through a relative at a civil registry, provided they are legal permanent residents in Cuba.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents:  There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions:  None

Comments:  The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cuban nationals in the United States or any other third country.  All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order.  If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document.  Consular officers can request documents to be legalized by MINREX to validate their authenticity.

Death Certificates

Available

Fees:  Procedures and fees can vary depending on whether the individual requesting the death certificate lives in Cuba or abroad.

Cuban national living in Cuba:

Death certificates can be requested at any civil registry, either at the one where the registration was made, or the one in the municipality the deceased resided.  In order to request the death certificate of an individual, the interested party must provide a five CUP stamp and the information regarding the death registration (name and surname of the deceased, place and date of death, place of burial, and tome and folio of the death registration).  Delivery time may vary from one day to a week.  Cuban nationals living in Cuba pay in CUP.

Cuban national living abroad and foreigners:

  • Death certificates can be requested at any civil registry through a third party living in Cuba.  If the interested party is in Cuba, it can be requested through International Legal Consultancy (Consultoría Jurídica Internacional – CJI-; there is a branch office in each province). The fee for requesting it is 125 CUP.  Its legalization at MINREX costs 375 CUP and it also requires a 125 CUP in stamp affixed to the document.  Foreigners and Cuban nationals without a permanent residence must pay the stamps in CUP. Cuban nationals living in Cuba pay in CUP. The time the International Legal Consultancy takes to deliver the death certificate may vary, but it is usually between 15 to 20 working days.  If the interested party is not in Cuba, they may also request the certificate through a Cuban consulate abroad. The fees and processing times depend on each consulate.

Document Name:  Certificación de defunción.

Issuing Authority:  Registro del Estado Civil (Civil Registry).  Civil registries belong to the Ministry of Justice.  There is one Civil Registry in each of the 168 municipalities in Cuba.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Registrador (Registrar).

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Death certificates can be issued in a printed format on letter size white paper or on a pre-printed form, with handwritten information added.  They must have a five CUP stamp, the seal of the civil registry and the signature of the registrar that issues the document.

Registration Criteria:  Deaths must be registered at civil registries within 24 hours of the death, usually upon receipt of a medical death certificate.  The registration is usually made at the civil registry in the municipality where the deceased last lived.  The registration must have the date and place of the death, name and surname of the deceased, cause of death, place of burial, the civil registry where the death is recorded, etc.

Procedure for Obtaining:  Death certificates are available from civil registries for Cuban citizens residing in Cuba, and the interested individual can request it themselves or through a third party.  Formerly resident Cuban citizens, including all dual citizens, are considered as exclusively Cuban citizens by the Cuban Government.  They must request civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad if they are abroad, or at the International Legal Consultancy if they are in Cuba.  They may also request it through a relative at a civil registry, provided they live in Cuba as a Cuban citizen.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents:  There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions:  None

Comments:  The Cuban authorities do not accept requests for civil documentation from a U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cuban nationals in the United States or any other third country.  All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order.  If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document.  Consular officers can request documents to be legalized by MINREX to validate their authenticity.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees:  Procedures and fees may vary depending on whether the individual requesting the marriage certificate lives in Cuba or abroad.

Cuban national living in Cuba:

Marriage certificates should be requested at any civil registry, either at the one where the registration was made, or the one in the municipality where the individual resides.  In order to request the marriage certificate, the interested party must provide a five CUP stamp and information regarding the marriage registration (name and surname of the spouses, place and date of the marriage, place of registration, and tome and folio of the registration).  Delivery times may vary from one day to a week.

Cuban national living abroad:

Marriage certificates should be requested at any civil registry through a third party living in Cuba.  If the interested party is in Cuba, it should be requested through the International Legal Consultancy. The fee for requesting it is 1,250 CUP.  Its legalization at MINREX costs 375 CUP and it must have a125 CUP stamp affixed to the document.  Foreigners and Cuban nationals living outside Cuba must pay the stamps in CUP. Cuban nationals living in Cuba pay in CUP.  CJI delivery times for a marriage certificate may vary, but it is usually between 15 to 20 working days.  If the interested party is not in Cuba, the certificate may also be requested through a Cuban consulate abroad.  The fees and delivery times depend on each consulate.

Document Name:  Certificación de matrimonio.

Issuing Authority:  Registro del Estado Civil (civil registry).

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Registrador.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Marriage certificates can be issued in a printed format in letter size white paper or in a pre-printed form, with handwritten information added.  They must have a five CUP stamp, the seal of the civil registry, and the signature of the registrar that issues the document.

Registration Criteria:  Marriages must be registered at the corresponding civil registry for the municipality where the marriage takes place.  There are three ways to get married in Cuba according to Cuban law; 1) by a special registrar of Palacio de los Matrimonios (palace of marriages; a special institution of the Civil Registry); 2) by notary publics; or 3) by courts (courts can recognize a common law marriage that existed in the past and formalize it). Registrars inscribe the marriage at the civil registry corresponding to the local Palacio de los Matrimonios; notary publics must send a copy of the notarial marriage deed to the civil registry of the municipality where the marriage was celebrated for its registration within 72 hours of the ceremony. Courts must also send the marriage decree to the civil registry corresponding to the plaintiff’s address within 72 hours of the ruling for its registration.  Marriage inscriptions must include the personal data of the spouses, place and date of marriage, civil registry where the marriage is inscribed, citizenship and civil state of the spouses, retroactive date of marriage, if required, etc.

Procedure for Obtaining:  Marriage certificates are available from civil registries for Cubans living in Cuba, and individuals may request the document themselves or through a third party.  Formerly resident Cuban citizens, including all dual citizens, are considered as exclusively Cuban citizens by the Cuban Government, and must request civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad if they are abroad, or at the International Legal Consultancy if they are in Cuba.  They can also request it through a relative or contact at a civil registry, if they live in Cuba as a Cuban citizen.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents:  There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions:  None.

Comments:  Same-sex marriage is not recognized in Cuba. Cuban notaries are different from notaries in the United States.  A U.S. notary is someone serving the public as an impartial witness when important documents are signed.  Public notaries in Cuba (under the civil law system) are public employees with a bachelor’s degree in law with a specialization in Cuban notarial law (derecho notarial).  These notaries are authorized to certify certain legal acts according to law.  The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.  All documents' requests made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington; D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order.  If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document.  Consular officers can request documents to be legalized by MINREX to validate their authenticity.

Cuba issues “retroactive” (retrotraidas) marriage certificates to couples who legalize their relationship after they have been living together.  This retroactive date is used in Cuba for legal/financial issues between the couple, but cannot be used for U.S. immigration purposes.

Divorce Certificates

Available

Fees:  Procedures and fees may vary depending on whether the individual requesting the divorce certificate lives in Cuba or abroad.

Cuban national living in Cuba:

Divorce certificates should be requested at any Civil Registry, generally either at the one where the marriage was registered, or the one in the municipality where the individual resides.  In order to request it, the interested party must provide a five CUP stamp and information regarding the marriage registration (name and surname of the spouses, place and date of the marriage, place of registration, and tome and folio of the registration).  Delivery times may vary from one day to a week.

Cuban national living abroad:

Divorce certificates can be requested at any civil registry through a third party living in Cuba. If the interested party is in Cuba, it can be requested through the International Legal Consultancy. The request fee is 3,750 CUP.  Its legalization at MINREX costs 375 CUP and must have a 125 CUP stamp affixed to the document. The time it takes CJI to deliver the divorce certificate may vary, but it is usually between 15 and 20 working days.  If the interested party is not in Cuba, the certificate can be requested through a Cuban Consulate abroad.  The fees and processing time depend on each consulate.

·         Document Name:  Certificación de divorcio (divorce certifícate), escritura notarial de divorcio (notarial deed of divorce), or sentencia de divorcio (divorce decree).

Issuing Authority:  Civil registries (registro civil), notaries (notarías), or courts (tribunales).

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Divorce certificates are issued by registrars at civil registries, notarial deeds of divorce are issued by notary publics at notaries, and divorce decrees are issued at courts by the secretary of the court.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Divorce certificates and divorce decrees can be issued in a printed format on letter size white paper or on a pre-printed form, with handwritten information.  Notarial deeds of divorce are issued on a legal-size white sheet with three sets of parallel red lines on the sides in the front and two in the back; the information on it is printed. All three must have a five CUP stamp, the seal of the issuing authority and the signature of the public employee that issues the document.

Registration Criteria:  Divorce in Cuba can be obtained from a court (tribunal) or a notary’s office (notaría).  When the process is completed, both institutions must send the information regarding the divorce to the designated civil registry according to their location so it can update the information on the former spouses’ civil status.

Procedure for Obtaining:  Divorce certificates are available from civil registries for Cuban residents, and they can request the document themselves or through a third party.  Formerly resident Cuban citizens, including all dual citizens, are considered as exclusively Cuban citizens by the Cuban government.  They must request civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad if they are abroad, or at the International Legal Consultancy if they are in Cuba.  They can also request it through a relative or a contact at a civil registry, if they live in Cuba as legal residents. When a divorce is concluded, former spouses receive a copy of the notarial deed of divorce or the divorce decree.  After the divorce information is sent by the court or the notary public and registered at the Civil Registry, former spouses can request a divorce certificate from the registry.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents:  Although Civil Registries are the institutions established by law to issue certificates proving an individual civil status, Cuban legal practice allows notarial deeds of divorce and court divorce decrees evidence to prove civil status regarding marriage and divorce.

Exceptions:  None.

Comments: The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.  All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order.  If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document.  Cuban civil registries also issue certifications of single status(certificación de soltería).Consular officers can request documents to be legalized by MINREX to validate their authenticity.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable:  Adoption is not common in Cuba.  Cuban law does not permit adoption by non-Cuban citizens.  In Cuba, there is no distinction between adopted children and biological children.  When the adoption process concludes with the court’s ruling, the adoption is registered in the folio where the child’s birth is registered, the child’s registration in the civil registry appears with the name of the adoptive parent/s as if they were the biological parents.  No public records of the adoption are available, except for the adoption decree or adoption certificate the adoptive parents get from court.  The birth certificate of the adopted child will not state the child is adopted.  All existing biological parent-child legal bonds and relationship end with the adoption of the child, as well as those between the child and the biological parents’ biological family members.

Identity Card

Available

Fees:  National ID cards are available for Cuban nationals or foreigners who are legal permanent or temporary residents in Cuba.  Cuban ID cards (carnet de identidad), have a fee of 25 CUP in stamps.  IDs are issued to individuals at the age of 16.  Children under the age of 16 are issued a minor card (tarjeta de menor) , and have a fee of a 5 CUP stamp.

Document name:  Carnet de identidad, carnet de identidad del extranjero (foreigner ID), and tarjeta de menor (minor card).

Issuing Authority: Office of Identification, Immigration, and Foreign Issues of the Ministry of Interior (Oficina de identificación, inmigración y extranjería del Ministerio del Interior).

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format / Security features:  Biometric data, holograms, micro texts, photo, digital signature, invisible print, double image, and areas of mechanic reading.  All Cuban residents must have one and always carry it.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  There is no issuing authority personnel title.

Registration Criteria:  The registration process is automatic.

Procedure for Obtaining:  These documents are available at the Offices of Identification, Immigration and Foreign Issues of the Ministry of Interior.  Minor cards are given to the parents of a child at birth, usually at hospitals or at the Offices of Identification, Immigration and Foreign Issues.  IDs must be requested at those offices too.

Alternate Documents:  There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions: None.

Comments: None.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Certificates

Available

Fees:  Procedures and fees may vary depending on whether the individual requesting the police certificate needs it to travel abroad or to use it in Cuba.

Police certificate with legal effects abroad:

Individuals must obtain it through the International Legal Consultancy.  The fee for requesting it is 1,250 CUP and a five CUP stamp.  Its legalization at MINREX costs 375 CUP and needs a stamp of 40 CUP.  The time it takes CJI to deliver police certificates may vary, but it is usually between 15 to 20 working days.  If the interested party is not in Cuba, the certificate should be requested through a Cuban Consulate abroad.  The fees and processing time depend on each consulate.

Police certificate with legal effects in Cuba:

Individuals can request it directly at any of the offices of the Central Registry of Criminals (Registro Central de Sancionados), which belongs to the Ministry of Justice.  This Registry office is responsible for registering, certifying, and cancelling sentences.  A 5 CUP  stamp must be provided to obtain it.

Document Name:  Certificación de antecedentes penales.

Issuing Authority:  Central Registry of Criminals (Registro Central de Sancionados).

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Police certificates are issued in a printed format on letter size white paper.  They must have a five CUP stamp, the seal of the Central Registry of Criminals and the digitized signature of the head of the Central Registry of Criminals. In order to determine if the police certificate was obtained through CJI or directly from the registry, the upper left side of the document must be reviewed.  Under Certificacion de Antecedentes Penales, it reads either Exterior Personal (CJI) or Nacional Personal (registry).

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  All police certificates are issued under the competence of the head of the Central Registry of Criminals by each of the offices of criminal records.

Registration Criteria:  The Central Registry of Criminals works with an automated system.  Information about crimes committed by individuals is sent automatically from the courts to the registry.

Procedure for Obtaining:  Police certificates can be obtained through CJI or directly at the offices of the Central Registry of Criminals.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents:  There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions:  None.

Comments:  The cancelation of criminal records can be made upon request of the interested party or automatically.  Automatic cancelations take place 10 years after the sentence is completed.  This cancelation of criminal records results in their removal from all public records, although often criminal records are not canceled automatically after the corresponding time.  Timelines for the cancelation of criminal records on request of the interested party:

a)       Ten years when the sentence is 10 to 30 years’ imprisonment;

b)      eight years when the sentence is six to 10 years’ imprisonment;

c)       five years when the sentence is three to six years’ imprisonment;

d)      three years when the sentence is one to three years’ imprisonment; or

e)      One year when the sentence is not imprisonment.

Court/Prison Records

Available

Fees:  To request court records the interested person must provide a five Cuban pesos stamp to the Court.

Document Name:  Certificación de Sentencia (sentence certificate)

Issuing Authority:  Courts.  Individuals that are sentenced to prison are given upon their release a certificate stating they served the sentence imposed on them by court.  Sentence certificates are available from courts; interested parties should be able to obtain them from the court’s secretary.  However, a full copy of the sentence (Certificación Literal de Sentencia) sometimes cannot be obtained.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Sentence certificates are normally issued in a printed format on letter size white paper.  They must have a five CUP stamp, the stamp of the court, and the signatures of the president of the court and of the court’s secretary.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Court’s secretary (Secretario del Tribunal).

Registration Criteria:  Courts keep records of their final rulings in registration tomes at the court secretary’s office or archive.  Sentences are registered after the trial is concluded.  

Procedure for Obtaining:  Interested individuals can request sentence certificates at the court that issued the sentence.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents:  Individuals who are sentenced for a crime are given a copy of the sentence.  In some cases, courts can issue a verbatim transcript of the sentence.  This literal copy will have all the information in the original sentence (facts description and law-based decision of the court).

Exceptions:  None.

Comments: Post has not seen any prison records aside from the certificate individuals are given upon their release from prison.  Sentence certificates and verbatim transcript certificates of sentences of other court rulings, not criminal law related, can also be obtained.

Military Records

Not Readily Available:  While Cuba authorizes a certificación sobre registro militar (certificate of military records) to document military service, there is no reliable procedure for requesting or receiving this document.  When available, the certificación shows if an individual has served the active military service (servicio militar activo)

Comments: Military service is mandatory in Cuba for all males.  It lasts two years, only one year for males who have finished high school (12th grade) and are to enter university.  Service is voluntary for women.  This certificate is commonly known in Cuba as Annex 1 (Anexo 1).

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Available:  Passport.

Fees:  The only passport requiring a fee is the regular passport.  Other types of passports are not personal and are requested by public institutions.  Regular passports cost 2,500 CUP and this fee must be provided in stamps for that value.  Passports are valid for two years and can be extended in two-year increments up to a total of six years.  Extensions have a total fee of 500 CUP in stamps for that value.

Document Name:  Regular passport (pasaporte corriente), diplomatic passport (pasaporte diplomatico), official passport (pasaporte official), pasaporte de servicio (service passport), and sailor passport (pasaporte de marino).

Issuing Government Authority:  Office of Identification, Immigration and Foreign Issues of the Ministry of Interior (Oficina de Identificación, Inmigración y Extranjería del Ministerio del Interior).

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Cuban passports are not ICAO or EU compliant.  Cuban passport issuance is controlled by the Ministry of the Interior, and counterfeit Cuban passports are believed to be rare.  The current version of the Cuban passport contains minor security features such as watermarks, tactile features, anti-scan patterns, and specific designs.  However, it does not have biometric information in the form of a fingerprint, nor UV reaction on the paper if the photo is altered.  There is no RFID chip or intaglio printing.  Each type of passport has a predominant color, from the cover to the inside pages:  Regular – blue; diplomatic – black or green, official –red; service – brown; and sailor – green.

 

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  There is no issuing authority personnel title.

Registration Criteria:  There is an internal administrative process within the Office of Identification, Immigration and Foreigners of the Ministry of Interior once a passport is requested.

Procedure for Obtaining:  The only type of passport that can be requested by an individual is the regular passport.  This type is issued to Cuban citizens that need to travel abroad for personal reasons, to those with an authorization to live abroad, and to those that have immigrated.  These can also be requested by a public employer for an employee.  Cubans living in Cuba must request their regular passport at the appropriate Office of Identification, Immigration and Foreign Issues of the Ministry of Interior.  They must provide their Cuban ID or tarjeta de menor.  The process takes between seven to 21 working days. Minors under 18 must also provide a notarial document authorizing the issuance of the passport, and one parent must be present for the process.

Cubans living abroad can request their regular passport in Cuba through the International Legal Consultancy.  Obtaining a new passport costs 5,625 CUP and requires a stamp for the value of 2,500 CUP.  Extensions costs 2,000 CUP and require a stamp for 500 CUP for a two-year extension.  Passports can also be requested at Cuban consulates abroad.  The fees and processing times depend on each consulate.

Alternate Documents:  There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions:  None.

Comments:  None.

Other Records

There are no other records.

 

Visa Issuing Posts

Post Title:  Embassy of the United States of America, Havana, Cuba.

Address:  Calzada between L & M Streets | Vedado | Havana | Cuba.

Phone Number: (+53)-7-839-4100.

Comments / Additional Information:  None.

Visa Services

Two embassies – the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Cuba, and the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown, Guyana – process immigrant visa cases for Cubans applicants. The National Visa Center will schedule applicants for appointments at either the U.S. Embassy in Havana or at the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown, Guyana, depending on the Department of State’s operational needs.  Nonimmigrant visas services are limited to official visas and emergency cases.  American citizen services are fully operational.

Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.